Dry-Tech Water Damage Restoration Services

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5 Responses to Dry-Tech Water Damage Restoration Services

  1. Dry-Tech Water Damage Restoration Services says:

    Water Damage Call Dry-Tech (610) 304-5117 http://www.restore-911.com

    • Ardmore

    • Bala Cynwyd & Merion
    • Berwyn & Devon
    • Broomall
    • Bryn Mawr
    • Chester Springs
    • Downingtown
    • Gladwyne
    • Glen Mills
    • Haverford
    • Havertown
    • Kennett Square
    • Malvern
    • Media
    • Narberth
    • Newtown Square
    • Paoli
    • Phoenixville
    • St. Davids, Radnor & Villanova
    • Unionville & Chadds Ford
    • Wayne & Strafford
    • West Chester
    • Wynnewood

  2. Dry-Tech Water Damage Restoration Fire Damage Restoration Building Restoration Services says:

    Water Damage Restoration Services http://www.restore-911.com Water Damage
    18041 EAST GREENVILLE
    18054 GREEN LANE
    18070 PALM
    18073 PENNSBURG
    18074 PERKIOMENVILLE
    18076 RED HILL
    18084 SUMNEYTOWN
    18915 COLMAR
    18918 EARLINGTON
    18924 FRANCONIA
    18936 MONTGOMERYVILLE
    18957 SALFORD
    18958 SALFORDVILLE
    18964 SOUDERTON
    18969 TELFORD
    18971 TYLERSPORT
    18979 WOXALL
    19001 ABINGTON
    19002 AMBLER
    19004 BALA CYNWYD
    19006 HUNTINGDON VALLEY
    19009 BRYN ATHYN
    19012 CHELTENHAM
    19025 DRESHER
    19027 ELKINS PARK
    19031 FLOURTOWN
    19034 FORT WASHINGTON
    19035 GLADWYNE
    19038 GLENSIDE
    19040 HATBORO
    19044 HORSHAM
    19046 JENKINTOWN
    Water Damage Restoration MERION STATION
    19072 NARBERTH
    19075 ORELAND
    19090 WILLOW GROVE
    19095 WYNCOTE
    19096 WYNNEWOOD
    19401 NORRISTOWN
    19403 NORRISTOWN
    19404 NORRISTOWN
    19405 BRIDGEPORT
    19406 KING OF PRUSSIA
    19407 AUDUBON
    19408 EAGLEVILLE
    19409 FAIRVIEW VILLAGE
    19420 ARCOLA
    19422 BLUE BELL
    19423 CEDARS
    19424 BLUE BELL
    19426 COLLEGEVILLE
    19428 CONSHOHOCKEN
    19429 CONSHOHOCKEN
    19430 CREAMERY
    19435 FREDERICK
    19436 GWYNEDD
    19437 GWYNEDD VALLEY
    19438 HARLEYSVILLE
    19440 HATFIELD
    19441 HARLEYSVILLE
    19443 KULPSVILLE
    19444 LAFAYETTE HILL
    19446 LANSDALE
    19450 LEDERACH
    19451 MAINLAND
    19452 MIQUON
    19453 MONT CLARE
    19454 NORTH WALES
    19455 NORTH WALES
    19456 OAKS
    19462 PLYMOUTH MEETING
    19464 POTTSTOWN
    19468 ROYERSFORD
    19472 SASSAMANSVILLE
    19473 SCHWENKSVILLE
    19474 SKIPPACK
    19477 SPRING HOUSE
    19478 SPRING MOUNT
    19483 VALLEY FORGE
    19484 VALLEY FORGE
    19485 VALLEY FORGE
    19486 WEST POINT
    19490 WORCESTER
    19492 ZIEGLERVILLE
    19525 GILBERTSVILLE
    Collegeville PA
    Spring City PA

  3. DRYTECH WATER DAMAGE PROS CERTIFIED IICRC says:
  4. Dry-Tech Water Damage Restoration Services says:

    Dry-Tech Ice Dam Damage insurance experts ans Restoration Services Call
    Now (610) 304-5117 for Emergency Services Ice Dams – Several quick fixes
    but only one cure. Call Dry-Tech water damage services certified (610)
    304-5117
    Ice_dam_slate_roof in

    Map of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing
    Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).
    Under Pennsylvania law, there are five types of incorporated
    municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, Home Rule Municipalities
    (which can include communities that bear the name “Borough” or “Township”)
    and, in at most two cases, towns. The following boroughs, townships, and
    Home Rule Municipalities are located in Montgomery County:

    Home rule municipalities[edit]
    Bryn Athyn (official name remains “Borough of Bryn Athyn”)
    Cheltenham Township
    Horsham Township
    Norristown
    Plymouth Township
    Whitemarsh Township

    Boroughs[edit]

    Ambler
    Bridgeport
    Collegeville
    Conshohocken
    East Greenville
    Green Lane
    Hatboro
    Hatfield
    Jenkintown
    Lansdale
    Narberth
    North Wales
    Pennsburg
    Pottstown
    Red Hill
    Rockledge
    Royersford
    Schwenksville
    Souderton
    Telford (lies partly in Bucks County)
    Trappe
    West Conshohocken

    Townships[edit]

    Abington
    Douglass
    East Norriton
    Franconia
    Hatfield
    Limerick
    Lower Frederick
    Lower Gwynedd
    Lower Merion
    Lower Moreland
    Lower Pottsgrove
    Lower Providence
    Lower Salford
    Marlborough
    Montgomery
    New Hanover
    Perkiomen
    Salford
    Skippack
    Springfield
    Towamencin
    Upper Dublin
    Upper Frederick
    Upper Gwynedd
    Upper Hanover
    Upper Merion
    Upper Moreland
    Upper Pottsgrove
    Upper Providence
    Upper Salford
    West Norriton
    West Pottsgrove
    Whitpain
    Worcester

    Philadelphia PA Collegeville PA ,Exton PA , Conshohocken PA

    ICE DAMS: Several quick fixes but only one cure.
    An Ice Dam is a hump of ice that forms at the edge of a roof under certain
    wintertime conditions. An ice dam can damage both your roof and the inside
    of your home. It will put gutters and downspouts at risk too.
    Ice Dams are a common sight in Northern New England winters, and Home
    Partners has dealt with quite a few. There are several things you can do to
    avoid getting an ice dam or to reduce the risk of damage after one has
    formed, but there’s really only one cure: a combination of better sealing,
    insulation, and venting in the attic and eaves.
    HOW DO ICE DAMS FORM?
    An ice dam forms when the roof over the attic gets warm enough to melt the
    underside of the layer of snow on the roof. The water trickles down between
    the layer of snow and the shingles until it reaches the eave of the roof,
    which stays cold because it extends beyond the side of the house. There,
    the water freezes, gradually growing into a mound of ice.
    The flatter the pitch of the roof, the easier it is for an ice dam to get a
    grip. Gutters at the eaves can also trap snow and ice. If snow and ice
    build up high enough in the gutter, it can provide a foundation for an ice
    dam.
    roof-ice-dam
    WHAT DAMAGE DO ICE DAMS CAUSE?
    When an ice dam gets big enough, melted water backs up behind it and seeps
    underneath the shingles. Eventually, it will drip into the insulation and
    down into the ceilings and exterior walls beneath the eave, ruining
    sheetrock and paint. If the ice dam breaks free, it can pull shingles and
    gutters off with it, and it will damage anything it falls on: shrubs,
    windowsills, cars, pets, and people. If the roof sheathing stays wet, it
    can form mildew and start to rot.
    HOW CAN YOU DEAL WITH AN ICE DAM?
    There are two avenues of attack: dealing with an existing ice dam and
    preventing one in the first place.
    DEALING WITH EXISTING ICE DAMS
    1. Remove the ice dam by breaking it free in small chucks. Do NOT use an ax
    or other sharp tool! You’ll cut through the shingles. Instead, tap lightly
    with a blunt mallet. This is slow, dangerous work, so hire someone
    experienced at roofing. Even if you do it safely, the chunks of ice can
    take pieces of shingle with them.
    2. Clear out gutters and downspouts. Again, this is ladder work and an easy
    way to damage either plastic or metal gutters and spouts.
    3. Melt troughs through the ice dam with calcium chloride ice melter. Do
    NOT use rock salt! It will damage paint, metals, and plants beneath the
    eave and wherever the salty water drains.
    A good trough-maker is a tube of cloth (a leg from an old pair of panty
    hose works well). Fill it with calcium chloride, tie off the top, and lay
    it vertically across the ice dam. It will slowly melt its way down through
    the dam, clearing a path for the underlying water to flow free.
    PREVENTING ICE DAMS
    You can scrape snow from the roof whenever it falls, using a snow rake from
    below or a broom or plastic shovel from above. BE CAREFUL: The first method
    can bury you in snow, while the second can send you slipping off the roof.
    Hire someone who knows how to use a safety line.
    You can replace your shingle roof with standing seam or other metal roof.
    Or you can replace the bottom three feet or so of your shingle roof with a
    wide metal drip edge. Whatever you do, install a water-repellant membrane
    under any new roofing.
    NOTE: If your roof is not very steep, an ice dam can still form on metal
    roofing and drip edges.
    THE CURE
    All of these methods treat the symptoms, not the underlying problem, which
    is the warm roof, caused by poor insulation and venting of the space under
    the roof. We have found that the only way to cure an ice dam – and prevent
    one in the first place – is to:
    1. Seal all points where warm air leaks from the living space into the
    spaces immediately below the roof sheathing.
    2. Insulate the living space well enough to prevent conduction and
    convection of heat through the ceiling.
    3. Vent the space between the insulation and the roof sheathing, so any
    heat that does leak through is carried away.
    The diagram on this page gives a good idea of what needs to be sealed,
    insulated and ventilated:

    http://www.restore-911.com

    The ice dam cure will also cure a significant loss of heat from your home.
    It’s a win-win situation: The money you save on fuel bills will pay for the
    work to protect yourself from ice dams, and your tighter home will feel
    more comfortable during these cold New England Winters
    – See more at: http://home-partners.com/articles/ice-dams-quick-fixes

  5. Dry-Tech Water Damage Restoration Services says:

    Dry-Tech Ice Dam Damage insurance experts ans Restoration Services Call
    Now (610) 304-5117 for Emergency Services Ice Dams – Several quick fixes
    but only one cure. Call Dry-Tech water damage services certified (610)
    304-5117
    Ice_dam_slate_roof in

    Map of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing
    Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).
    Under Pennsylvania law, there are five types of incorporated
    municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, Home Rule Municipalities
    (which can include communities that bear the name “Borough” or “Township”)
    and, in at most two cases, towns. The following boroughs, townships, and
    Home Rule Municipalities are located in Montgomery County:

    Home rule municipalities[edit]
    Bryn Athyn (official name remains “Borough of Bryn Athyn”)
    Cheltenham Township
    Horsham Township
    Norristown
    Plymouth Township
    Whitemarsh Township

    Boroughs[edit]

    Ambler
    Bridgeport
    Collegeville
    Conshohocken
    East Greenville
    Green Lane
    Hatboro
    Hatfield
    Jenkintown
    Lansdale
    Narberth
    North Wales
    Pennsburg
    Pottstown
    Red Hill
    Rockledge
    Royersford
    Schwenksville
    Souderton
    Telford (lies partly in Bucks County)
    Trappe
    West Conshohocken

    Townships[edit]

    Abington
    Douglass
    East Norriton
    Franconia
    Hatfield
    Limerick
    Lower Frederick
    Lower Gwynedd
    Lower Merion
    Lower Moreland
    Lower Pottsgrove
    Lower Providence
    Lower Salford
    Marlborough
    Montgomery
    New Hanover
    Perkiomen
    Salford
    Skippack
    Springfield
    Towamencin
    Upper Dublin
    Upper Frederick
    Upper Gwynedd
    Upper Hanover
    Upper Merion
    Upper Moreland
    Upper Pottsgrove
    Upper Providence
    Upper Salford
    West Norriton
    West Pottsgrove
    Whitpain
    Worcester

    Philadelphia PA Collegeville PA ,Exton PA , Conshohocken PA

    ICE DAMS: Several quick fixes but only one cure.
    An Ice Dam is a hump of ice that forms at the edge of a roof under certain
    wintertime conditions. An ice dam can damage both your roof and the inside
    of your home. It will put gutters and downspouts at risk too.
    Ice Dams are a common sight in Northern New England winters, and Home
    Partners has dealt with quite a few. There are several things you can do to
    avoid getting an ice dam or to reduce the risk of damage after one has
    formed, but there’s really only one cure: a combination of better sealing,
    insulation, and venting in the attic and eaves.
    HOW DO ICE DAMS FORM?
    An ice dam forms when the roof over the attic gets warm enough to melt the
    underside of the layer of snow on the roof. The water trickles down between
    the layer of snow and the shingles until it reaches the eave of the roof,
    which stays cold because it extends beyond the side of the house. There,
    the water freezes, gradually growing into a mound of ice.
    The flatter the pitch of the roof, the easier it is for an ice dam to get a
    grip. Gutters at the eaves can also trap snow and ice. If snow and ice
    build up high enough in the gutter, it can provide a foundation for an ice
    dam.
    roof-ice-dam
    WHAT DAMAGE DO ICE DAMS CAUSE?
    When an ice dam gets big enough, melted water backs up behind it and seeps
    underneath the shingles. Eventually, it will drip into the insulation and
    down into the ceilings and exterior walls beneath the eave, ruining
    sheetrock and paint. If the ice dam breaks free, it can pull shingles and
    gutters off with it, and it will damage anything it falls on: shrubs,
    windowsills, cars, pets, and people. If the roof sheathing stays wet, it
    can form mildew and start to rot.
    HOW CAN YOU DEAL WITH AN ICE DAM?
    There are two avenues of attack: dealing with an existing ice dam and
    preventing one in the first place.
    DEALING WITH EXISTING ICE DAMS
    1. Remove the ice dam by breaking it free in small chucks. Do NOT use an ax
    or other sharp tool! You’ll cut through the shingles. Instead, tap lightly
    with a blunt mallet. This is slow, dangerous work, so hire someone
    experienced at roofing. Even if you do it safely, the chunks of ice can
    take pieces of shingle with them.
    2. Clear out gutters and downspouts. Again, this is ladder work and an easy
    way to damage either plastic or metal gutters and spouts.
    3. Melt troughs through the ice dam with calcium chloride ice melter. Do
    NOT use rock salt! It will damage paint, metals, and plants beneath the
    eave and wherever the salty water drains.
    A good trough-maker is a tube of cloth (a leg from an old pair of panty
    hose works well). Fill it with calcium chloride, tie off the top, and lay
    it vertically across the ice dam. It will slowly melt its way down through
    the dam, clearing a path for the underlying water to flow free.
    PREVENTING ICE DAMS
    You can scrape snow from the roof whenever it falls, using a snow rake from
    below or a broom or plastic shovel from above. BE CAREFUL: The first method
    can bury you in snow, while the second can send you slipping off the roof.
    Hire someone who knows how to use a safety line.
    You can replace your shingle roof with standing seam or other metal roof.
    Or you can replace the bottom three feet or so of your shingle roof with a
    wide metal drip edge. Whatever you do, install a water-repellant membrane
    under any new roofing.
    NOTE: If your roof is not very steep, an ice dam can still form on metal
    roofing and drip edges.
    THE CURE
    All of these methods treat the symptoms, not the underlying problem, which
    is the warm roof, caused by poor insulation and venting of the space under
    the roof. We have found that the only way to cure an ice dam – and prevent
    one in the first place – is to:
    1. Seal all points where warm air leaks from the living space into the
    spaces immediately below the roof sheathing.
    2. Insulate the living space well enough to prevent conduction and
    convection of heat through the ceiling.
    3. Vent the space between the insulation and the roof sheathing, so any
    heat that does leak through is carried away.
    The diagram on this page gives a good idea of what needs to be sealed,
    insulated and ventilated:

    http://www.restore-911.com

    The ice dam cure will also cure a significant loss of heat from your home.
    It’s a win-win situation: The money you save on fuel bills will pay for the
    work to protect yourself from ice dams, and your tighter home will feel
    more comfortable during these cold New England Winters
    – See more at: http://home-partners.com/articles/ice-dams-quick-fixes

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